How EMDR Changes Lives

Adam Cayton-Holland is a comedian that shared his personal experience with trauma in the article “The Best Drug I’ve Ever Taken Wasn’t Even a Drug. It Was EMDR Therapy” (Cayton-Holland, 2018).  As a young man, Adam experience the traumatic loss of his little sister with whom he was quite close.

In the article, Adam shared how he sought help from various mental health professionals, but found minimal relief of his symptoms.  Until he found a professional who was trained in EMDR.  Adam described the process of EMDR as staggering and reported the skill his therapist had at moving him through the painful memories.  Adam revealed that after 7 to 8 sessions, he noticed relief of his distress and felt that the trauma was sufficiently processed.

Adam’s experience is one we see frequently when using this top tier trauma modality with those struggling with overwhelming distress.  Watching a person successfully process painful memories, reducing their experienced distress is so powerful.  That person is able to move through the pain and replace negative beliefs with positive beliefs.

The reward gained by seeing a client reach their therapeutic goals is priceless.

The Best Drug I’ve Ever Taken Wasn’t Even a Drug. It Was EMDR Therapy.

 

Being Mindful

It is easy to get caught up the busyness of everyday life.  With the various responsibilities, a moment of quiet may be difficult to achieve.  This chaotic and rushed mindset decreases a person’s awareness of the here-and-now.  Mindfulness is a practice by which an individual can become reconnected with his or her current experiences.  This act is intentional where one increases awareness in the present moment without judgment (Brown, Marquis, & Guiffrida, 2013).  Removing this judgment and increasing kindness toward self, the individual can engage in the present moment in an intentional manner.

Being Mindful

It is easy to get caught up the busyness of everyday life.  With the various responsibilities, a moment of quiet may be difficult to achieve.  This chaotic and rushed mindset decreases a person’s awareness of the here-and-now.  Mindfulness is a practice by which an individual can become reconnected with his or her current experiences.  This act is intentional where one increases awareness in the present moment without judgment (Brown, Marquis, & Guiffrida, 2013).  Removing this judgment and increasing kindness toward self, the individual can engage in the present moment in an intentional manner.